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Additional instructions and information for each of the questions on the checklist is provided below.

 

Land Disturbance
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
Activities that involve movement of soil, fill, sod, gravel, etc. of 50 or more cu. yrds. but results in a total of less than 1 acre of disturbance Soil disturbances and fill movement affecting areas of less than 1 acre may be subject to municipal requirements for stormwater management and/or fill permitting.

Activities that result in a total of 1 acre or more of soil disturbance, including staging areas or multi-phase projects. Soil disturbances and fill movement affecting areas of 1 acre or more are subject to NYS DEC stormwater management requirements, in addition to any local stormwater management or fill requirements that apply.

Activity with the potential to unearth contaminted soils (i.e. fill areas, spill sites, etc) EH&S maintains a database of internally reported spills

Creating or modifying a permanent stormwater management practice (i.e. rention pond, sand filter, swale, etc) or an outfall  Permanent stormwater management practices may be regulated under Operation and Maintenance Agreements with municipalities which require that changes be reviewed and approved before implementation. Such practices otherwise should be maintained such that they function as intended by design to manage runoff from developed areas. Changing or creating a stormwater outfall rerquires review and approval, including possible permitting through NYS DEC or Army Corps of engineers.

Water
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
Creating or modifying a drain, discharge, or process that results in discharges to a system or location other than a municipal sanitary sewer. Wastewater and discharges that are not purely stormwater must be directed to appropriate outlets, unless otherwise permitted through NYS DEC or excepted pursuant to regulations.

Creating or modifying a drain or process that results in discharges of laboratory, industrial or non-sewage wastewater to the sanitary sewer system. Includes temporary or one-time discharges. Discharges to the sanitary sewer system must be in accordance with the local Sewer Use Law or authorized by permission or permit.

Adding or modifying heating, cooling or dehumidifying equipment which will result in a wastewater discharge to the sanitary sewer Discharges to the sanitary sewer system must be in accordance with the local Sewer Use Law or authorized by permission or permit.

Installation or modification of pretreatment equipment to treat wastes or wastewater prior to discharge into the santiary sewer system. Systems required to treat or neutralize wastewater so that it is acceptable for discharge to the sewer require review/approval by the Ithaca Area Wastewater Treatment Facility.

Discharges to the sanitary sewer system must be in accordance with the local Sewer Use Law or authorized by permission or permit.

Discovery of a drain for which the ultimate discharge location has not been verified. Wastewater shall be discharged to appropriate drains or outlets. If a drain destination is unknown wastewater should not be discharged until the drain outfall is verified and determined to be appropriate for the waste stream.

Operation or maintenance activities that involve cleaning or surface preparation of buildings, equipment, or vehicles that generate runoff or wastewater. Some cleaning and maintenance activities can generate runoff or wastewater that may not be discharged to the environment or storm system, or may be subject to treatment or other restrictions.

Activity will result in discharges or runoff to the storm sewer system or to surface waters that is not entirely composed of stormwater. All storm drains discharge to water bodies eventually. No discharge may result in a contravention of water quality standards and most discharges are not authorized, or must have a permit.

Air
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
New or modified lab hood Plans to change existing lab hoods, specifically hoods that have specific programmatic permitting requirements (for example hoods used with radioactive materials), must be reported to the appropriate Environmental Health & Safety Specialist for an evaluation of the impact to existing permits or the need to permit new sources.

New or modified exhaust or emission point Both the type of equipment or process generating emissions to air and the location of the facility may impact the need for obtaining (or modifying) a permit. Processes requiring further investigation can be as complex as powered exhaust systems or as simple as 'fugitive emissions' from a piece of equipment. Please contact EH&S in the project planning stages to assure permitting needs are addressed during planning.

New or modified fresh air intake Air modeling may be needed to assure that a proposed air intake does not create a hazard to building occupants by drawing in exhaust from another facility or potentially hazardous location.

Any new or modified equipment or processes with potential air emissions Examples
  • water heaters
  • boilers, furnaces, or other combustion sources
  • cooling towers
  • degreasers
  • chemical or petroleum storage tanks
  • fuel dispensing
  • generators (emergency or other generators)
  • machining operations
  • vacuum pumps
  • wood working
  • painting operations
  • non-lab chemical processing
  • fumigation

Any new or modified refrigerant-containing equipment Including cooling systems, dehumidifiers, growth chambers, coolers and freezers, etc. Equipment containing more than 50 pounds of refrigerant charge has additional compliance implications. These units need to be reported to EH&S and the AC&R Shop when they are installed as the University is responsible for maintaining a list of equipment with more than 50 pounds charge. In addition, equipment containing more than 50 pounds charge may be subject to ongoing record-keeping and maintenance requirements (depending on the refrigerant used). There may be long term regulatory advantages to using equipment with smaller charges or different refrigerants if another option is feasible.

Wetlands, Streams, and Natural Areas
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
Work includes activities in, over, under, or within 50 ft of a stream, creek, lake or wetland. Most streams, lakes and wetland areas are regulated. Activities near, in or discharging to surface waters or wetlands require advanced authorization from Army Corps of Engineers and/or NYS DEC, if allowed at all. Such review and permitting can sometimes take up to 45 to 60 days before work can begin, if authorized.

Wetland present or suspected on site. Wetlands, including created wetlands, are often regulated. Work may be subject to setback requirements or permitting.

Work in a designated Tompkins County Unique Natural Area or Cornell designated natural area TC Unique Natural Areas FAQs http://www.tompkins-co.org/emc/docs/12_faq_about_unas.pdf
TC UNA Map http://www.tompkins-co.org/emc/docs/9_una_countywide_map.pdf
Cornell Natural Areas http://www.cornellplantations.org/our-gardens/natural-areas/profiles

Plan to create or remove a drainage outfall to a creek, stream, lake or wetland. Changing or creating an outfall rerquires review and approval, including possible permitting through NYS DEC or Army Corps of engineers.

Storage of Petroleum or Chemicals
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
Addition or change to a petroleum or chemical storage tank (container that requires the use of a pump to remove the product), or associated piping or equipment (e.g. emergency generator)
  • Containers may need to be registered with the regulating authority
  • Registration information may need to be updated or modified
  • Storage may need to be added to the facility's spill prevention plan

Temporary petroleum tank at a construction site or other site
  • Secondary containment must be provided
  • Tank must be properly labelled
  • Spill cleanup materials must be on site
  • A release of petroleum occurs during construction or renovation either by Cornell or contractor (off hours contact 255-1111)

Are you storing/using chemicals or petroleum (or changed stored quantities recently?) that if released, spilled or involved in a fire, could pose a threat to safety, health, or the environment?" Examples (not inclusive)
  • One or more 55 gallon drums of petroleum products
  • Containers or bags of flammable, explosive, ignitable, or corrosive chemicals not intended for laboratory use
  • Heating/cooling systems using glycol
  • Lead-acid batteries
  • Water treatment systems (RO, cooling tower, boiler, etc.)
Examples of requirements for these aspects
  • Segregate incompatible substances 
  • Provide notification under the Emergency Planning & Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA) 
  • Report inventories under EPCRA and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) requirements  

Hazardous Waste
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
Generation of any known or potential hazardous wastes? Hazardous wastes may include (but not be limited to) solvents, PCBs, lead, mercury found in bulbs and switches and other toxic metals.

Agricultural and Animal Facility
Question from PM Checklist Additional Information and Instructions
Construction of an animal housing/feeding facility that meets or exceeds Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (CAFO) designation thresholds Certain animal facilities require permitting and management plans. Howerver, no wastewater generated at animal or agricultural facilities should be designed to runoff, enter storm drains or surface water bodies

Large Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (Large CAFO) means an Animal Feeding
Operation (AFO) that stables or confines as many as or more than the numbers of animals
specified in any of the following categories:
a. 700 Mature Dairy Cows, whether milked or dry
b. 1,000 Veal Calves
c. 1,000 Cattle, other than mature dairy cows or veal calves (Cattle includes but is not limited to heifers, steers, bulls and cow/calf pairs)
d. 2,500 Swine, each weighing 55 pounds or more
e. 10,000 Swine, each weighing less than 55 pounds
f. 500 Horses
g. 10,000 Sheep or Lambs
h. 55,000 Turkeys
i. 30,000 Laying Hens or Broilers, if the AFO uses a liquid manure handling system
j. 125,000 Chickens (other than laying hens),if the AFO uses other than a liquid manure handling system
k. 82,000 Laying Hens, if the AFO uses other than a liquid manure handling system
l. 30,000 Ducks, if the AFO uses other than a liquid manure handling system
m. 5,000 Ducks, if the AFO uses a liquid manure handling system

Medium Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation (Medium CAFO) means an Animal feeding Operation (AFO) that stables or confines the type and number of animals that fall within any of the following ranges:
a. 200-699 Mature Dairy Cows, whether milked or dry
b. 300-999 Veal Calves
c. 300-999 Cattle, other than mature dairy cows or veal calves (Cattle includes but is not limited to heifers, steers, bulls and cow/calf pairs) 30
d. 750-2,499 Swine, each weighing 55 pounds or more
e. 3,000-9,999 Swine each weighing less than 55 pounds
f. 150-499 Horses
g. 3,000-9,999 Sheep or Lambs
h. 16,500-54,999 Turkeys
i. 9,000-29,999 Laying Hens or Broilers, if the AFO uses a liquid manure handing system
j. 37,500-124,999 Chickens (other than laying hens), if the AFO uses other than a liquid manure handling system
k. 25,000-81,999 Laying Hens, if the AFO uses other than liquid manure handling systems
l. 10,000-29,999 Ducks, if the AFO uses other than a liquid manure handling system
m. 1,500-4,999 Ducks, if the AFO uses a liquid manure handling system